Solar blanket

Drover

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Yep, should I start a new thread or continue here,
I have a standard 2008 16-49-1 with a battery, that much I know. We have run the lights off the battery but that is all. Not sure I have anywhere else that I can use.
Might need to replace battery as well as it is most probably to old
What else?


Yep, I'd start a new thread @1DayIll , as its a great topic and would evolve to a biggy especially if mike and Booties get their fingers tapping away at full noise,:):);)....

If I had a trip planned to the SiL's at Kinglake you could have inspected Big Mal in person for a uncomplicated,functional off grid set up but no plans for heading south that far, Yet.
 
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Macca_75

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I wa sgoing to buy another 100/20 so I had a spare on the road "in case something went wrong" wit the one for the built in solar. But using your size comparison the 75/15 is so much smaller (no heat sink on the back and the mounting brackets that the 100/20 has). I think I'll go the 75/15 instead (I don't think the 75/10 will be enough capacity - I got just over 8A out of the PWM controller.

You've sold me @Crusty181 - ebay also currently has 10% off promo code.
 
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mikerezny

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Thanks Falco
Yes I do, don't know wattage though but it's about 1100*900*40 in size
Alan
Hi,

That makes it about a 200-250W panel.
The standard solar for rating a panel is 1000W/sq m. That panel is 0.99sq m.
Solar Panel efficiency is usually between 20 - 25%.
Meaning a 1 sq m panel would produce about 200W to 250W.

cheers
Mike
 

coys 53

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Thanks Mike
Don't know if it's a retro fit or a factory fit given that it is s tourer with axle turned over I would like to think it's a retro
Alan
 

Boots in Action

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To the people wondering about a mppt controller over a PWM. I replaced the PWM controller on my caravan because I noticed that the PWM controller was not turning on until about 90 minutes after the sun came up in the morning. I purchased a bluetooth Victron controller and it turns on at the first "sniff" of sunlight. The extra money paid for the mppt controller is well worth it. In my opinion

Hi @Falco , your response is typical of those replacing PWM controllers with proper MPPT controllers. There is an important part of solar generation - irradiance or light. Even on very dull days or early morning or fast changing light as in cloudy days, any light produces voltage. Even though current may be very very small, too small for a PWM controller to convert into USEFUL power, the MPPT controller is able to convert that panel voltage (approx 17 - 18 volts) into USEABLE current , even if only small amounts. The solar panel voltage may be 18 volts and the battery voltage may only be 12.2 volts. In a MPPT controller that difference in voltage is not wasted as in a PWM type. Hence the advantages. Voltage does drop off as light fails, but is still significant in dull conditions and early light.
Glad you are happy with a MPPT controller!
 

Boots in Action

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I wa sgoing to buy another 100/20 so I had a spare on the road "in case something went wrong" wit the one for the built in solar. But using your size comparison the 75/15 is so much smaller (no heat sink on the back and the mounting brackets that the 100/20 has). I think I'll go the 75/15 instead (I don't think the 75/10 will be enough capacity - I got just over 8A out of the PWM controller.

You've sold me @Crusty181 - ebay also currently has 10% off promo code.

Hey @Macca_75 , when purchasing MPPT controllers, remember the first figure is MAX VOLTAGE INPUT and the second one is AMPS that can be handled continuously at charging voltage - say 12 to 15 volts. The higher first figure really only relates as importance for those connecting panels in SERIES. If connecting in parallel, OUTPUT is the only relevant figure as panel voltage for each panel is approx 17 to 18 volts. For my setup, I have 3 panels in SERIES so input voltage to controller is important to me at approx 50 to 56 volts which the controller converts to 12 to 15 volts (and more amps) as necessary. One advantage of SERIES connection is that much lighter wiring and longer runs without significant voltage drop is possible - 50 volts over 30 metre line as against 17/18 volts or less over same length.
 

Macca_75

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Hey @Macca_75 , when purchasing MPPT controllers, remember the first figure is MAX VOLTAGE INPUT and the second one is AMPS that can be handled continuously at charging voltage - say 12 to 15 volts. The higher first figure really only relates as importance for those connecting panels in SERIES. If connecting in parallel, OUTPUT is the only relevant figure as panel voltage for each panel is approx 17 to 18 volts. For my setup, I have 3 panels in SERIES so input voltage to controller is important to me at approx 50 to 56 volts which the controller converts to 12 to 15 volts (and more amps) as necessary. One advantage of SERIES connection is that much lighter wiring and longer runs without significant voltage drop is possible - 50 volts over 30 metre line as against 17/18 volts or less over same length.
Yeap - Thanks. I've seen 8A coming off the 200W Kings blanket (my battery was stuffed so it was charging this and trying to run the fridge). Thats why I opted for the 75/15 instead of the 75/10 - I figured the effeciency of the MPPT might just push up to or over 10A - and I don't like running things at their max anyway. In a pinch (If I were remote) I could use it on the vans fixed panel until I had time to purchase another. I never intend to run to panels off the little second controller however I did get the 100/20 for the van - for the slim chance I may want to add another panel at some stage to the roof - doubt I will though.

I have learnt so much over the past month or so about Solar and batteries - hell I *think* I could even help someone if they were in a pickle when camping....
 

Boots in Action

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Yeap - Thanks. I've seen 8A coming off the 200W Kings blanket (my battery was stuffed so it was charging this and trying to run the fridge). Thats why I opted for the 75/15 instead of the 75/10 - I figured the effeciency of the MPPT might just push up to or over 10A - and I don't like running things at their max anyway. In a pinch (If I were remote) I could use it on the vans fixed panel until I had time to purchase another. I never intend to run to panels off the little second controller however I did get the 100/20 for the van - for the slim chance I may want to add another panel at some stage to the roof - doubt I will though.

I have learnt so much over the past month or so about Solar and batteries - hell I *think* I could even help someone if they were in a pickle when camping....


That's what this friendly forum is all about @Macca_75 - helping each other! We are ALL learning something to improve our knowledge - "stealing/borrowing each others' ideas". I have learnt plenty too! Only a fool thinks he has nothing to learn! Happy camping.
 
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coys 53

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HI guy's
The numbers you are quoting ie: 100/20 do they mean 100amps in and 20 out or 100amp solar converted to 20 at the controller
 

Boots in Action

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HI guy's
The numbers you are quoting ie: 100/20 do they mean 100amps in and 20 out or 100amp solar converted to 20 at the controller

No @coys 53 !! For MPPT controllers, the first figure is MAX VOLTAGE INTO controller from panels. The second figure is the MAX AMPERAGE OUTPUT to battery that can be produced or handled. There are usually safety factors built into good controllers to prevent damage eg input voltage would be limited to rated figures. A PWM controller does not mention the higher figure as they are NOT capable of handling the higher INPUT voltages that MPPT controllers can and are only suitable for up to 20 volts approx. Over this voltage will destroy (or shut down??) a PWM controller!! . PWM controllers only list max current output.
 

Macca_75

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No @coys 53 !! For MPPT controllers, the first figure is MAX VOLTAGE INTO controller from panels. The second figure is the MAX AMPERAGE OUTPUT to battery that can be produced or handled. There are usually safety factors built into good controllers to prevent damage eg input voltage would be limited to rated figures. A PWM controller does not mention the higher figure as they are NOT capable of handling the higher INPUT voltages that MPPT controllers can and are only suitable for up to 20 volts approx. Over this voltage will destroy (or shut down??) a PWM controller!! . PWM controllers only list max current output.
I think it's more you would never connect panels in series to PWM as the excess voltage is wasted - on MPPT excess voltage is converted Amps (hence why they are more efficient). Connecting in Series vs Parallels (fro MPPT) will depend on many factors as to which is better for each scenario.
 

Drover

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I would like to point out my Prostar-35 PWM controller can handle 60v solar input and will outperform most PWM units and most cheap MPPT units, it cost a S$$#@t load so better be good...... as for working better than an MPPT or worse I will never know as I don't let my batteries get down to the state where an MPPT controller performs at its best......... For caravans I can see no advantage to going with a series set up of panels, on house panels big voltage is needed to cover loss, not on little caravan runs.

Another link to muddy the waters...... https://12voltblog.com.au/a-guide-to-using-solar-panels-and-regulators/
 

Crusty181

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I'll have a look next time I'm in Vic.................. was that EST or ESDT ?????
ESDT ... modern Mexicans are cool with the faded curtains and carpet. 1 hour extra every day for us. Extra work, solar, bank interest, healing, Home & Away. Bread rises faster, chips stay hot longer ... whats not to like ??