PX Ranger, Limp home mode but no fault code

Bluey

Well-Known Member
Mar 31, 2014
3,217
5,652
113
50
victoria
#61
I wanted to bye a new ute but so many small issues can shut it down and not easy to fix im staying away see how the Dpfs go in tine after many years i dont trust all this stuff
 

Fordy

New Member
Jun 11, 2018
3
2
3
Burpenagry EastQld
#62
Mark - another question please, how did/do you measure the return fuel temp? Is there a sensor that can be logged via the OBD2 port?

Cheers
Jim
Hi Jim,
Fuel temp can be read through OBD2 port if you have the correct Scan tool, usually high end workshops and dealers have them to analyse and reset fault codes, unfortunately high fuel temp doesn’t through a fault code on the Ranger.

The normal fuel temperature range is 30-40 degrees, the highest temp recorded for my Ranger during testing was 85 degrees.

If you search the internet and talk to diesel experts, as my mechanic did, you’ll find a number of causes for fuel temp.
1. Fuel Lines at fuel filter the wrong way around (usually after a fuel filter change)
2. Faulty fuel filter assembly
3. High pressure fuel pump with a sticky piston.
The last being the most expensive of the above repairs.

It wasn’t until we’d exhausted all of the above options leaving only fuel lines and fuel tank that the mechanic found the damaged fuel return line near the fuel cooler at the rear of the fuel tank.

My advise to you is to take your Ranger back to the people who fitted your fuel tank to have them check for any kinked fuel lines that may have occurred during installation.

Cheers and good luck

PS Please let me know how you go?
 
Mar 10, 2018
2
4
3
Australia
#63
HI,
I had same problem with my 2012 px 3.2 TD all of a sudden going into limp mode for no reason esp on a very hot day, read through this forum and discovered that the fuel lines were connected incorrectly, supposed to be blue blue, red red. I cannot tell you how happy i am that I read this and have repaired it myself after spending $500 on a new air flow mass meter.....
Thank you so much to the person who posted this issue......

Thanks Rog #51
 
Likes: Delano

Tanamite2

New Member
Jul 12, 2018
4
1
3
Brisbane
#65
Hi Jim,
Fuel temp can be read through OBD2 port if you have the correct Scan tool, usually high end workshops and dealers have them to analyse and reset fault codes, unfortunately high fuel temp doesn’t through a fault code on the Ranger.

The normal fuel temperature range is 30-40 degrees, the highest temp recorded for my Ranger during testing was 85 degrees.

If you search the internet and talk to diesel experts, as my mechanic did, you’ll find a number of causes for fuel temp.
1. Fuel Lines at fuel filter the wrong way around (usually after a fuel filter change)
2. Faulty fuel filter assembly
3. High pressure fuel pump with a sticky piston.
The last being the most expensive of the above repairs.

It wasn’t until we’d exhausted all of the above options leaving only fuel lines and fuel tank that the mechanic found the damaged fuel return line near the fuel cooler at the rear of the fuel tank.

My advise to you is to take your Ranger back to the people who fitted your fuel tank to have them check for any kinked fuel lines that may have occurred during installation.

Cheers and good luck

PS Please let me know how you go?
Mark, I followed your advice and checked the fuel temp in the return fuel line and it went as high as 88 degrees coinciding with the loss of power & speed. Further investigation found that the return fuel line was kinked just as in your case. This has now been fixed, however I have not had the vehicle out under load yet to confirm 100% that it was the cause. I have to do a trip out early August so I'll report back either way.

Thanks again for posting your experience.

Cheers
Jim
 
Likes: chartrock

Fordy

New Member
Jun 11, 2018
3
2
3
Burpenagry EastQld
#66
Mark, I followed your advice and checked the fuel temp in the return fuel line and it went as high as 88 degrees coinciding with the loss of power & speed. Further investigation found that the return fuel line was kinked just as in your case. This has now been fixed, however I have not had the vehicle out under load yet to confirm 100% that it was the cause. I have to do a trip out early August so I'll report back either way.

Thanks again for posting your experience.

Cheers
Jim
That’s fantastic news Jim! I’m pleased that someone benefited from the knowledge I gained from my bad experience.

The tank I had fitted causing all my problems was an ARB Frontier tank. In the interest of others being aware of possible problems to be mindful of. Can you share what make of tank you had fitted and where it was fitted?

Cheers
Mark
 

Tanamite2

New Member
Jul 12, 2018
4
1
3
Brisbane
#67
That’s fantastic news Jim! I’m pleased that someone benefited from the knowledge I gained from my bad experience.

The tank I had fitted causing all my problems was an ARB Frontier tank. In the interest of others being aware of possible problems to be mindful of. Can you share what make of tank you had fitted and where it was fitted?

Cheers
Mark
Mark, I opted for a Brown Davis, installed by Opposite lock Springwood. The boys down there have been pretty good to deal with albeit sometimes a bit slow to follow up & return phone calls but in the end they were great once we were certain it was related to the tank.

I did a loop through Maleny Kenilworth area on Sunday with a few steep hills & no problems so looks like the problem is fixed.

Cheers
Jim
 

Ranger13

New Member
Feb 21, 2019
2
2
3
Sunshine West
#68
Giday folk, love the info on the px ranger loss of power particularly while towing. I too have experienced the the frustration while towing my boat or camper. Never had a problem in five years of owning the truck until late last year. Serviced engine including fuel filter. 3.2lt 6 speed manual. 2013 with 90k on the clock. Problem would occur mainly in afternoon with high ambient temperatures. No engine light, no logged codes. Struggle to accelerate past 40kph particularly from start or during a climb. Found problem to have been incorrectly fitted fuel lines at the filter. Sorted them out and bresto problem gone. Can't blame anyone but myself, complacency, a mans greatest threat.
 

Macca_75

Well-Known Member
Aug 3, 2016
491
449
63
44
SE Suburbs, Vic.
#69
Giday folk, love the info on the px ranger loss of power particularly while towing. I too have experienced the the frustration while towing my boat or camper. Never had a problem in five years of owning the truck until late last year. Serviced engine including fuel filter. 3.2lt 6 speed manual. 2013 with 90k on the clock. Problem would occur mainly in afternoon with high ambient temperatures. No engine light, no logged codes. Struggle to accelerate past 40kph particularly from start or during a climb. Found problem to have been incorrectly fitted fuel lines at the filter. Sorted them out and bresto problem gone. Can't blame anyone but myself, complacency, a mans greatest threat.
Interesting as I am battling the same issue when towing the van. High temps, going up long hill climbs, all power drops. Might have to get the fuel lines double checked to make sure they are a) correctly fitted and b) no kinks, etc.

Not being mechanical (so not knowing what to look for), this is a job for the little brother....
 

Macca_75

Well-Known Member
Aug 3, 2016
491
449
63
44
SE Suburbs, Vic.
#70
https://www.saeb.net/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=58

As per this site the fuel temp can be read with an Ultraguage using these parameters..:

FUEL TEMPERATURE

TDATA: 07E02205220000
TCTRL: 93 RCTRL: 31
RPOS: 2008 MTCH: 620522
X: 0001 /: 0001 +: FFD8
OUT: 00 AVE: 00
L/R: 30

@RickB, Would you happen to know how to set this in TorquePro?

The values don't seem to convert straight across.
 

BaxnRach

Active Member
Apr 5, 2013
101
173
43
50
Cobram Vic
#71
Make sure your fuel lines are on the filter the right way around, a fairly common problem apparently, read this on newranger, just last week.
Edit, I see this was mentioned above.
 

Ranger13

New Member
Feb 21, 2019
2
2
3
Sunshine West
#72
Interesting as I am battling the same issue when towing the van. High temps, going up long hill climbs, all power drops. Might have to get the fuel lines double checked to make sure they are a) correctly fitted and b) no kinks, etc.

Not being mechanical (so not knowing what to look for), this is a job for the little brother....
Giday Macca, sorry to hear you too are having problems with your tug. For your info if you look from the front of your vehicle and view your fuel filter, the order of the connections from the centre of the vehicle should be blue at the top left with a blue directly below it. The top right should be red with red directly below it. It has been known for the top two to be fitted incorrectly by the experts. For your information diesel fuel losses its performance potential the hotter the fuel gets. That is why I won't allow the fuel level in the tank to drop below quarter full. Also another item to look at is the fuel cooler which was fitted to Mk1 Rangers, it has been emitted on mk 2 & 3 Rangers. If one is fitted ensure that it is clean, the cooler resembles a smart radiator which is made of alloy. Give it a wash with water. It is located just above the rear axle on the left side.
Another point of interest is that on heavy earth moving machinery, the fuel tank is made of steel. With ambient air flowing around the tank, this help the heat transfer from the warm fuel. Modern vehicles are fitted with plastic tanks, a good insulator if you ask me. Sorry for yapping on. Anyway hope all goes well with your tugregards Ranger13.
 

Macca_75

Well-Known Member
Aug 3, 2016
491
449
63
44
SE Suburbs, Vic.
#73
Giday Macca, sorry to hear you too are having problems with your tug. For your info if you look from the front of your vehicle and view your fuel filter, the order of the connections from the centre of the vehicle should be blue at the top left with a blue directly below it. The top right should be red with red directly below it. It has been known for the top two to be fitted incorrectly by the experts. For your information diesel fuel losses its performance potential the hotter the fuel gets. That is why I won't allow the fuel level in the tank to drop below quarter full. Also another item to look at is the fuel cooler which was fitted to Mk1 Rangers, it has been emitted on mk 2 & 3 Rangers. If one is fitted ensure that it is clean, the cooler resembles a smart radiator which is made of alloy. Give it a wash with water. It is located just above the rear axle on the left side.
Another point of interest is that on heavy earth moving machinery, the fuel tank is made of steel. With ambient air flowing around the tank, this help the heat transfer from the warm fuel. Modern vehicles are fitted with plastic tanks, a good insulator if you ask me. Sorry for yapping on. Anyway hope all goes well with your tugregards Ranger13.
Thanks - I'll have a look at the hoses later today - that seems easy enough to check.

I'll look for the fuel cooler but can't say I've ever seen one. I have removed the plastic standard tank and had a Brown Davis long range tank fitted (Steel). I'd love to find how to add the fuel temp to TorquePro and get a feeling for what *normal* is and what it is when the issue occurs.

Must check the date when I added the long range tank and see if that lines up with when I first experienced the issue.